Rock Heads


Leonie Brandner. 2016

These rocks are known as the ‘Pyramides d’Euseigne’, a natural rock formation in the Swiss Alps. The boulders were transported down the mountains by the glaciers during the last ice age more than 80 000 years ago. It was the retreating ice at the end of the ice age that left them sitting on softer debris. Under the influence of wind and weather the gravel started to erode and was washed away by the melt water. Only the parts right below the boulders were sheltered and remained intact. Like heads too heavy for their spindly necks, the boulders balance on the pyramids until gravity eventually gets the better of them.

Leonie Brandner works with immersive installations, sound, video and sculpture, photography, performance and story writing, and is interested in the relationship between people and places; the ways in which places become meaningful to people. She grew up in Switzerland, completed her BA in Fine Art at the Chelsea College of Art in London and lives in Berlin. Repeatedly experiencing the basic need to establish relationships in places she had none has gradually become a key theme of her work. It is an investigation into he invisible structures of the everyday: the way in which routine engagements with the world make things mean.

www.leoniebrandner.com